LOTTO PREDICTION. MYSTICAL RITUALS VS MATHS

There is a series of beliefs and studies on lotto games, such as “Dream Books” and “Aunt Sally’s Policy Players Dream Book” that have become the most famous and popular among players to predict winning lottery numbers.

The Internet provides a considerable number of resources as well, utilizing latest marketing, mathematical and financial instruments, in help of ambitious players aiming for winning lottery numbers or Dow Jones Index values.

“Aunt Sally’s Policy Players Dream Book”
A curiosity of hoodoo magic for gambling luck, “Aunt Sally’s Policy Players Dream Book” consists of nine separate alphabetical lists of objects and situations found in dreams with interpretations and lucky numbers for playing policy, an illegal (and now obsolete) lottery once popular in the black community. Also included is a reprint of a 19th century French divination system called the “Oraculum or Book of Fate,” based on an old Arabic system of sand-divination commonly called geomancy.

Dream books link dream images (e.g. dream of a cook or dream of a locomotive) to divinatory meanings (e.g. “you will receive a letter” or “beware a strange man”) and they also give numbers for betting (e.g. 5-14-50 or 65-41-55). In a typical numbers book, the dream images are listed in alphabetical order, with one, two, three, or four numbers beside each item, specifically designed for the convenience of those who bet on policy.

Here is an example of dreams and their numerical equivalents:

cat 14 
dog 4 
surgeon 10

So, say you dreamed that a surgeon was feeding a cat and a dog and he fed the cat first. If you wanted to make a gig wager, you would bet 10-14-4. But if you dreamed he fed the dog first, then you’d bet 10-4-14. Some dreams are given interpretations in pre-made 2-number saddle combinations and some in 4-number horses, but most dream images are given single numbers or 3-number gigs, as the latter was the most popular type of bet to place. For example:

butter (some good fortune, but mixed with sadness) 4, 7, 13
fan (your mistress will be inconstant) 5, 23, 31
judge (you will overcome an enemy) 28, 50, 70
ladder (going up, wealth; coming down, poverty) 11, 31, 43
policy office (foretells riches) 4, 11, 44

Not-so-coincidentally, 4, 11, 44, which signifies both “lottery” and “policy office,” is the number-set that Aunt Sally holds on the cover of her “Policy Players Dream Book.”

POLICY BLUES
From the 1920s through the 1950s, both the subject of policy gaming itself and the numerical combinations found in the dream books made their way into a number of blues songs. In the cleverest of these compositions, a series of dream book numbers would be substituted for crucial key words. Jim Jackson and Bumble Bee Slim (Amos Easton) both wrote songs of this type called “Policy Dream Blues,” and other blues artists who used policy number imagery in their lyrics were Bo Carter (Armentier Chatmon), Kokomo Arnold, Yodelling Kid Brown, Albert Clemens (Adam Wilcox), Elvira Johnson, and Peetie Wheatstraw. Typical of the genre is “Policy Blues” by Blind (Arthur) Blake, recorded in December 1930 in Grafton, Wisconsin, for Paramount Records.